The Blue Ridge Parkway, from Virginia to North Carolina…

October 24, 2009

As I mentioned, we stayed the prior night in an inn at “Meadows of Dan;” in the morning we looked around a little to see what “Dan” has to offer. After I took the opportunity to run a mile or two on the Blue Ridge Parkway (a rare chance for a runner?), we set out. Aside from the aforementioned restaurant-to-which-we-shall-never-return, we found, of all things, a candy factory! Nancy’s Candy Company makes a full line of chocolates, fudges, right there on the premises, and the samples were delicious! They ship too, so if you want to give some unusual and high quality candy, link over to their website at Nancy’s Candy Company; believe me, they won’t disappoint. You’ll see a photo of a small corner of their large factory/store on our gallery.

The Mabry Mill, near Meadows of Dan; Most photographed site on the Blue Ridge Parkway

The Mabry Mill, near Meadows of Dan; most photographed site on the Blue Ridge Parkway

We’d passed up the Mabry Mill in the previous night’s darkness, but wanted to see it in daylight, witness the Mill above. A very interesting place, showing all kinds of ancient crafts and vocations in practice, as, for example, the lady spinning yarn:

Lady spinning yarn at the Mabry Mill

Lady spinning yarn at the Mabry Mill

You’ll see other findings in our gallery; Jane enjoyed getting some scoop on Great Smoky colors from Ranger Weston, who swings a mean axe!

The Puckett Cabin, home of "Aunt" Orelena Hawks Puckett

The Puckett Cabin, home of "Aunt" Orelena Hawks Puckett

To appreciate the photo above, first of all, it shows 3 types of rail fencing commonly used in days of yore: On the left is a “Snake Rail” fence, joined across the middle by a “Post and Rail” fence, which in turn connects to a “Picket Fence.” Another type of fence, the “Buck Rail” fence, is shown in our gallery.

But the most amazing story represented by the photo is that of Orelena Hawks Puckett, who lived most of her life in this cabin. Born in 1837, she bore 24 children, none of whom lived beyond infancy! But, she went on to become a valued and treasured midwife, delivered more than 1,000 babies in every kind of weather or time of day, delivering one in the last year of her life, 1939, at the age of 102!

So we kept moving southward through the day, stopped at the Blue Ridge Music Center at Cumberland Knob, VA for a nice little concert, and picked up a very good Blue Grass CD for easy listening in the car. Then, it was into North Carolina, and as the gallery shows, lots of good scenery there, including this one of the “Fox Hunter’s Paradise:”

A Fox Hunter's Overview of North Carolina...

A Fox Hunter's Overview of North Carolina...

As night was falling, we strove to find the falls of the Linville River, had to hike in about 0.8 mile for that, and the light was fading fast. But I did manage to catch a good pose of Jane in front of the darkening falls behind:

Jane in front, Linville River falls behind in fading light

Jane in front, Linville River falls behind in fading light

But alas, the day came into darkness, and we were still some distance away from Weaverville, NC, our evening’s destination. So, dauntless, we drove on to our B&B there, looking forward to a rainy Friday at the Biltmore House, more about which later. See our gallery for more photos along the Blue Ridge Parkway. Thanks again for looking!

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4 Responses to “The Blue Ridge Parkway, from Virginia to North Carolina…”

  1. Jan Fenwick said

    We continue to enjoy your gorgeous photos and envy your wonderful idea! Thanks so much for sharing! Jan & Bob

  2. Don McDonald said

    That’s a neat Blue Ridge panorama, John! Well done.

  3. Rhys said

    I love that neat water mill.

  4. Sharon said

    These photos are especially appealing to me. Love the mill! And the commentary is interesting and elegant, as always 🙂

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